After the War on Tobacco, Is a War on Alcohol Brewing?*

The United Kingdom now has one of the most comprehensive tobacco control policies in the world, a far cry from its status two decades ago. Some influential public health voices have called for a similar campaign against alcohol consumption. But is the comparison appropriate? We identify the factors which were important in the relatively successful campaign for tobacco control, then analyse the obstacles and opportunities facing the movement for more stringent alcohol control. Alcohol policy today bears a striking resemblance to tobacco policy pre-1990s, when the UK started on its path to becoming a major regulatory state in the world. Can alcohol policy be changed in a similar way?

Paper here  Cairney Studlar 2014 WMHP Alcohol and Tobacco Policy UK

See also –

See also:

*We submitted the paper to a US journal, where this framing is more normal. The idea of a public health crusade is also in good currency in some libertarian circles.


Filed under agenda setting, alcohol, alcohol policy, Evidence Based Policymaking (EBPM), Public health, tobacco, tobacco policy, UK politics and policy

4 responses to “After the War on Tobacco, Is a War on Alcohol Brewing?*

  1. Pingback: The WHO Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (FCTC): What would have to change to ensure effective policy implementation?* | Paul Cairney: Politics and Policy

  2. Pingback: Why does public health policy change? | Paul Cairney: Politics & Public Policy

  3. excellently clear article and nicely detailed with recommendations on the
    5 conditions to be met to establish alcohol control.

  4. Pingback: Alcohol: the Harmful versus Healthy Debate | Paul Cairney: Politics & Public Policy

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